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Allusions of Exodus in Steinbeck's Grapes of Wrath

Protecting the Weak

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Allusion between Moses and Tom

"7:23 And when he was full forty years old, it came into his heart to visit his brethren the children of Israel.
7:24 And seeing one of them suffer wrong, he defended him, and avenged him that was oppressed, and smote the Egyptian:
7:25 For he supposed his brethren would have understood how that God by his hand would deliver them: but they understood not."
 
-Book of Acts, Old Testament

"Tom looked down at the preacher. The light crossed the heavy man's legs and the white new pick handle. Tom leaped silently. He wrenched the club free. The first time he knew he had missed and struck a shoulder, but the second time his crushing blow found the head, and as the heavy man sank down, three more blows found his head. The lights danced about. There were shouts, the sound of running feet, crashing through brush. Tom stood over the prostrate man."

-The Grapes of Wrath, Chapter 26, Page 527

In the Book of Acts, Moses is know to have "smote" the Egyptian who was beating and abusing the helpless, pitiful Israelite without provocation.  He acted not for himself, but to save the Israelite slave, to defend those weaker than him.  In Chapter 26 of The Grapes of Wrath, Tom "smotes" the corrupt deputy who had clubbed Casy to death, again, without provocation.  He acted not in his own interest, but in a helpless attempt to save his friend, one weaker than himself.  The connection between the two texts is explicit.  Each individual forsakes their own best interests in an attempt to do what is moral and righteous.  Each must face the consquences of their actions, Moses faced by his brothers and Tom by the law, and yet they still proceed to help those who cannot help themselves.  The following passage also discribes the morality of Tom and Moses.
 
"Then it don' matter.  Then I'll be all aoun' in the dark.  I'll be ever'where- wherever you look.  Wherever they's a fight so hungry people can eat, I'll be there.  Wherever they's a cop beatin' up a guy, I'll be there."
 
-The Grapes of Wrath, Chapter 28, page 572

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